Publication Detail

Roadway Infrastructure for Low Speed, Mini-Vehicles: Processes and Design Concepts

UCD-ITS-RP-94-42

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Suggested Citation:
Stein, Aram G., Kenneth S. Kurani, Daniel Sperling (1994) Roadway Infrastructure for Low Speed, Mini-Vehicles: Processes and Design Concepts. Transportation Research Record (1444), 23 - 27

The neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is a small, electric car designed for low-speed, local trips in neighborhoods and urban areas. The market potential for NEVs depends in part on the availability of a network of safe and accessible roads. The processes involved in developing new infrastructure are explored, and some design concepts are presented. To accommodate NEVs safely on existing roads designed for large vehicles and fast-moving traffic, infrastructure standards and designs will need to be modified; this will occur through a process of experimentation as the market for NEVs grows and planners and engineers discover which designs work and which do not. The results of local experiments will provide the evidence for modifying state and federal rules and guidelines codified in geometric and traffic control policy manuals. Ultimately the provision and management of road infrastructure must become more flexible to accommodate alternatives to the full-size, gasoline-powered automobile.