Publication Detail

The Impact of Rush Hour Traffic and mix on the Ozone weekend effect in Southern California

UCD-ITS-RP-07-04

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Suggested Citation:
Gao, Huaizhu O. and Debbie A. Niemeier (2007) The Impact of Rush Hour Traffic and mix on the Ozone weekend effect in Southern California . Transportation Research Part D 12 (2), 83 - 98

The ozone weekend effect refers to the counterintuitive observations showing weekend ozone concentrations frequently to be higher than or comparable to those observed on weekdays. Ozone dynamics are closely linked to the timing, magnitude and fleet mix of transportation activities, primary sources of ozone precursor emissions. To examine the effects of traffic activity on the ozone weekend effect, a statistical analysis was conducted of the weekly patterns of time dependent light-duty vehicle and heavy-duty truck volumes observed at 27 weigh-in-motion stations in southern California. The results show statistically significant variations in traffic flows by day of week, by vehicle type, and by location with respect to the Los Angeles metropolitan area. These variations in traffic, when converted to variations in running exhaust emissions, tend to support four of the seven California Air Resources Board’s ozone weekend effect hypotheses.

Keywords: Ozone weekend effect; Weekly traffic pattern; Nonparametric factorial analysis