Publication Detail

Design and Development of a Parallel Hybrid Powertrain for a High Performance Sport Utility Vehicle

UCD-ITS-RP-05-63

Reprint

Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways (STEPS)

Available online at: DOI: 10.4271/2005-01-3827

Suggested Citation: Singer-Englar, A., Kamisky, R., Erickson, P., Frank, A. et al., "Design and Development of a Parallel Hybrid Powertrain for a High Performance Sport Utility Vehicle," SAE Technical Paper 2005-01-3827, 2005, doi:10.4271/2005-01-3827.

A plug-in, charge-depleting, parallel hybrid powertrain has been developed for a high performance sport utility vehicle. Based on the Ford U152 Explorer platform, implementation of the hybrid powertrain has resulted in an efficient, high performance vehicle with a 0-60 mph acceleration time of 7.5 seconds. A dual drive system allows for four-wheel drive capability while optimizing regenerative braking and minimizing electric motor cogging losses. Design of the system focused on reducing petroleum use, lowering greenhouse gas emissions, and reducing criteria tailpipe emissions. Additionally, this vehicle has been designed as a partial zero emissions vehicle (PZEV), allowing the driver to travel up to 50 miles in a zero emission all-electric mode. High-energy traction battery packs can be charged from the grid, yielding higher efficiencies and lower critical emissions, or maintained through the internal combustion engine (ICE) as with a traditional hybrid vehicle. The ICE is primarily used to provide average power and maintain state of charge (SOC).